Everything Cinema 4D

Shave It by 3dar Studios


Animated short film by 3dar Studios.

Behind The Scenes

Synopsis
In the wilderness of the forests where giant bulldozers are tearing apart the woods there is a monkey that accidentally
finds a shaving machine and decides to use it. Spontaneously disguised as a human being, he moves out to the city and starts a career. After a stunning success in business, he understands the need of gaining political power. Not too long after, he becomes the president. Now he is ready to make a change.

DIRECTORS’ NOTES
For us, it’s an ironic reflection about how nature adapts to the human invasion. We found a great inspiration in an Amazonian bird, the Lira, which imitates the sounds it hears in the environment. It does it with such a lack of criticism or judgment that it imitates the other birds singing, the power saws noise or the crash of the trees falling in the same way. We must admit that part of the credits should go to Nahuel, a friend of us that shaves his arms in laughable ways.
We watched the monkey’s behaviour and the way they move, first in the zoos, then there was a trip to the Amazonian jungle and finally some actors friends, the monkey’s acting is the result of all this together. Regarding aesthetics, we wanted to choose the way of maximum expression possible, trying to get over the technique. In a free mix of 3D and 2D animation, saturated and live colours we found a harmony that reflects the nature’s freedom and that even loses its’ respect.

Japan – Heartbeats of Time


Japan – Heartbeats of Time by Trey Ratcliff

“Okay, stick with me for a minute here. I think an important thing to “think about” is the nature of human memory. We live life a certain speed. We are only immediately, consciously aware of about 30 frames per second. However, our brain does not record and react at 30 frames per second. It can do a lot more than that.

Our brains record memories like tiny fantastic movie reels, networked together by feelings, associations, and experience. As a photographer, I always have to remind myself that the brain does not store memories like a computer stores JPGs. We DO NOT take millions of snapshots and file them away. Nor do we take hour-long TiVo recordings of the day and store them for later retrieval. The truth is somewhere in between — fleeting thoughts of moments that grabbed you and will never leave.

We do certainly sense the world at greater than 30 frames per second. You know by experience that you can pick up on the micro-emotions that appear on people’s faces when you talk to them in person. You lose a lot of that over TV or Webcams. Those means can suffice, but, given the choice, in person is always better. Case in point, I’d wager to say some of your deepest memories were experienced in person rather than on TV or over a webcam, which take an arbitrary 30 (or 24) slices of time.”

Trey Ratcliff on The Science and Math Behind the Technique
From Stuck In Customs